Palnackie

   PALNACKIE, a village and sea-port, in the parish of Buittle, stewartry of Kirkcudbright, 6 miles (S. E.) from Castle-Douglas; containing 200 inhabitants. This place is situated on the river Urr, which is navigable from its influx into the Solway Frith to the village, for vessels not drawing more than seventeen feet water at spring, and twelve feet at neap, tides; and from the village to Dalbeattie, for vessels of smaller burthen. The port appears to have grown into consideration with the increase of Castle-Douglas, of which it is the chief shipping-place; and at present carries on a good trade in coal, lime, timber, slates, and various kinds of merchandise, and in fat-cattle, sheep, and other agricultural produce, with Glasgow and Irvine, with Liverpool, Whitehaven, and Workington, in the north of England, and also with North America. The number of vessels registered as belonging to the port is twenty, of the aggregate burthen of 1303 tons, and navigated by seventy-five men. A custom-house officer is stationed here; and all vessels in the coasting trade are cleared at the port both inward and outward. There is no regular harbour; but on one side of the creek a quay of wood has been constructed, at which six vessels can land or take in their cargoes at one time; and if it were extended along the bank of the river, and also on the opposite side of the creek, abundant accommodation would be provided for a very considerable number of vessels. No harbour-dues are exacted; but one farthing per ton is levied for the purpose of maintaining the quay in repair. About 11,000 quarters of grain, 125 tons of meal, 700 tons of potatoes, 3800 tons of timber, planks, and bark, and about 8000 head of fatcattle and sheep, are annually shipped from the port. A mail passes daily from Castle-Douglas through the village to Dalbeattie, and returns in the evening; and great facility of communication and conveyance is afforded by steam-packets.

A Topographical dictionary of Scotland. . 1856.

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